SCSA scores from 16 June 2018 (Temp = 93*)

ACC SCSA 6-16-2018 : 2018-06-16
ACC SCSA 6-16-2018
2018-06-16
Match Results - By Division

BUG
FinalNameUSPSA#ClassDivisionTime1: Speed Option2: Smoke & Hope3: Accelerator4: Pendulum5: Five To Go
1Smith, MarkA35965UBUG134.7226.0118.7825.5131.1633.26

CO
FinalNameUSPSA#ClassDivisionTime1: Speed Option2: Smoke & Hope3: Accelerator4: Pendulum5: Five To Go
1Davis, NeilL4304UCO107.4025.4614.3522.9525.3819.26
2Richey, MichaelTY42859UCO109.8829.2115.1624.0920.8120.61

COW
FinalNameUSPSA#ClassDivisionTime1: Speed Option2: Smoke & Hope3: Accelerator4: Pendulum5: Five To Go
1Mears, GeraldA45709UCOW154.1144.9620.3628.7731.1228.90

ISR
FinalNameUSPSA#ClassDivisionTime1: Speed Option2: Smoke & Hope3: Accelerator4: Pendulum5: Five To Go
1Smith, MarkA35965UISR125.6227.4418.4426.8928.9923.86

LTD
FinalNameUSPSA#ClassDivisionTime1: Speed Option2: Smoke & Hope3: Accelerator4: Pendulum5: Five To Go
1Hersh, DavidTY74911CLTD104.2724.6015.4320.0523.4320.76
2Duncan, JamesA105783DLTD127.2625.1816.9728.9731.1125.03
3Wilkinson, JasonA108585ULTD140.4630.8022.5626.9535.9124.24
4Rudd, GeraldULTD145.4139.2715.4227.3836.1027.24
5Baydoun, MichaelA14791ULTD172.3843.4422.9032.6135.9337.50

OPN
FinalNameUSPSA#ClassDivisionTime1: Speed Option2: Smoke & Hope3: Accelerator4: Pendulum5: Five To Go
1Davis, NeilL4304UOPN103.1919.9114.7921.0327.8219.64
2Hart, DanielTY-64065UOPN111.4727.0113.8718.5626.2625.77

PCCI
FinalNameUSPSA#ClassDivisionTime1: Speed Option2: Smoke & Hope3: Accelerator4: Pendulum5: Five To Go
1Rapala, Thomas STY80201APCCI70.9118.5310.2213.0215.0514.09

PCCO
FinalNameUSPSA#ClassDivisionTime1: Speed Option2: Smoke & Hope3: Accelerator4: Pendulum5: Five To Go
1Herrell, GregA88985APCCO60.0912.4810.6412.4713.2511.25
2Mears, GeraldA45709UPCCO70.3915.7610.9413.9114.9114.87
3Wessler, MichaelXPCCO73.7915.3312.2014.9016.0815.28
4Heerdink, TerryA-104731UPCCO74.3019.2011.3613.6614.6015.48
5Oliveira, TonyUPCCO81.0518.3012.0515.7714.9519.98
6Davis, KennethUPCCO95.8422.3914.1319.9118.8620.55
7Patton, BillUPCCO102.6622.1814.7816.9125.8822.91
8Fowler, DaveUPCCO120.5527.1416.8618.8520.5637.14

PROD
FinalNameUSPSA#ClassDivisionTime1: Speed Option2: Smoke & Hope3: Accelerator4: Pendulum5: Five To Go
1Rapala, Thomas STY80201BPROD102.1020.4313.9919.2821.8726.53
2Wessler, MichaelTY70828UPROD107.6524.6715.9520.9725.3720.69
3Darling, JimUPROD112.3824.4616.6221.2327.5222.55
4Anagnostou, JonathonA-112245UPROD138.4829.0321.0729.7630.1828.44
5WELSH, ERICL3909CPROD140.6041.1715.0226.5634.1823.67
6Caldwell, BrandonUPROD162.0145.0421.2728.1631.5236.02
7Cortrecht, EdA655858DPROD170.5244.6122.8331.3838.5333.17
8Fritzinger, AndrewUPROD171.1236.5718.4628.0344.4843.58
9Nading, ChuckA-112201UPROD208.8835.3125.2427.1074.2946.94
10Bailey, MelissaUPROD361.92113.5230.0069.3685.0863.96

RFPI
FinalNameUSPSA#ClassDivisionTime1: Speed Option2: Smoke & Hope3: Accelerator4: Pendulum5: Five To Go
1WELSH, ERICL3909BRFPI79.9319.1012.6617.0815.6115.48
2Herrell, GregA88985ARFPI87.0817.6813.3918.6817.8919.44
3Patton, BillURFPI147.6043.0221.0425.4429.5128.59
4Baydoun, MichaelA14791URFPI156.3448.2419.7831.3033.4623.56
5Butler, BrennanA-102211URFPI214.9958.6529.8240.1948.8537.48
6Butler, RogerURFPI234.3547.9323.4447.9663.3851.64
7DALTON, JOHNTY67131URFPI262.4596.1425.0438.4958.7244.06

RFPO
FinalNameUSPSA#ClassDivisionTime1: Speed Option2: Smoke & Hope3: Accelerator4: Pendulum5: Five To Go
1Clapp, DavidTY-48912BRFPO79.9820.1911.6515.1218.4814.54
2Hart, DanielTY-64065URFPO82.9118.5911.5014.9016.5221.40
3Enney, JamesURFPO87.1417.8713.3017.9319.5318.51
4Butler, MarkA-54958CRFPO120.3325.1417.5228.3128.9320.43
5Rake, ErinURFPO178.0849.6720.7928.3851.5427.70
6Oliveira, AustinURFPO204.2034.8822.7132.4975.1738.95

RFRO
FinalNameUSPSA#ClassDivisionTime1: Speed Option2: Smoke & Hope3: Accelerator4: Pendulum5: Five To Go
1Clapp, DavidTY-48912BRFRO67.9317.0510.3813.0614.0513.39
2Rake, ErinURFRO72.6115.0111.8912.4915.2317.99
3Enney, JamesURFRO73.8017.2412.1015.5315.5413.39
4Heerdink, TerryA-104731URFRO78.0920.4611.4914.7216.1915.23
5Hickman, HoraceFY65500URFRO84.5917.9512.4217.1614.9622.10
6Butler, BrennanA-102211URFRO85.2321.2913.0715.8615.3719.64
7Oliveira, AustinURFRO113.2023.8516.0420.1027.6425.57
8Oakes, JeffARFRO--10.74---

SGI
FinalNameUSPSA#ClassDivisionTime1: Speed Option2: Smoke & Hope3: Accelerator4: Pendulum5: Five To Go
1Fowler, DaveUSGI122.4231.5021.0418.2420.8430.80
2Oliveira, TonyUSGI123.6028.6224.2829.9415.2025.56

SS
FinalNameUSPSA#ClassDivisionTime1: Speed Option2: Smoke & Hope3: Accelerator4: Pendulum5: Five To Go
1Hersh, DavidTY74911BSS104.5622.5418.1417.4623.7822.64
2Barbour, JimL1762CSS112.7024.1216.8422.1424.2225.38
3Rudd, GeraldUSS117.1527.7813.8323.5226.8025.22
4Oakes, JeffBSS132.0332.6018.4822.6029.5028.85
5Butler, MarkUSS140.6538.4323.3125.9129.1423.86
6Crail, DeanA103936USS156.2232.3219.7329.6836.7737.72
7Howell, RichardA109530USS184.8939.8525.7537.4446.5735.28
8Schultz, DaleTY60552DSS--20.7629.02--

Generated by PractiScore for Android (1.5.14 samsung) at 2018-06-16 22:06 -0400

GLOCK GEN 5. DIFFERENCES FROM PREVIOUS GENS. (38 AND COUNTING...)

GLOCK GEN 5 (17, 19, 34 & 26)  CHANGES W.R.T. GEN 4, AND MANY TIMES GENs 3, 2, & 1 AS WELL.  (MOST, BUT NOT ALL APPLY TO THE 19X, AS WELL)    This is a work in progress (obviously...).  

Much has been made of the main 5 changes (1 through 6 below, less #2), but there has been much less discussion of the others.  "Over 20 changes" was a quote I heard a lot just prior to the release of the Gen 5 guns.   So for, I have found at least 38 differences form Gen 4 to Gen 5.

My take :: This is a much more distinct set of changes than 1 to 2, 2 to 3, or 3 to 4.   The result is less parts commonality.  (This is a GOOD thing, as the new designs are better.)

This is a fairly complete list, but if I have omitted anything, let me know in the comments.    Thx.

1.     ADDED A MOLDED-IN MAG WELL (BUT NOT ON THE 26-5 AS IT WOULD INTERFERE WITH GRIPPING THE GUN)

2.    CHAMFERED THE SLIDE NOSE (ALA OLDER 26, 27, 34, 35…)

3.    FINGER GROOVES REMOVED (CLOSER TO GEN 2)

4.    AMBIDEXTROUS SLIDE STOP LEVER

5.    GLOCK MARKSMAN BARREL (GMB)  (STILL POLYAGONAL, BUT DIFFERENT)

6.    BARREL HAS A CROWN CUT INTO THE MUZZLE

7.    LONGER RECOIL SPRING ASSEMBLY (BY ABOUT 0.25”)

8.    STRIKER HAS A ROUNDED CONTOUR ON THE FIRING PIN TIP

9.    FIRING PIN SAFETY PLUNGER GEOMETRY IS NOW LIKE 42 & 43; THUS MAKING THE ENGAGEMENT WITH THE TRIGGER BAR A BETTER ANGLE, AND MORE CONSISTENT

10. TRIGGER SPRING IS A COMPRESSION SPRING, (NOT TENSION)

11.  SLIDE LOCK SPRING IS COMPRESSION, (LIKE 42, 43)

12. AMBI SLIDE STOP LEVER SPRING IS COMPRESSION TYPE (AND USES THE IDENTICAL PART (G# 39567) AS TRIGGER SPRING AND SLIDE LOCK SPRING)

13. “PIN ONE” REMOVED (AGAIN, LIKE 42, 43  (AND OLDER 17, 19))

14. THE INSERT-MOLDED SLIDE RAILS ARE BEEFIER

15. MOLDED FRAME RAILS HAVE BEEN REMOVED (THE POLYMER PORTION)

16. SLIDE AND BARREL FINISH IS NEW (nDLC “nitrided DIAMOND LIKE CARBON")

17. TRIGGER GEOMETRY & SPRINGING == BETTER TRIGGER PULL & BREAK

18. LOCKING BLOCK GEOMETRY

19. NOTCH IN FRONT-STRAP FOR MAG REMOVAL (ALA GEN 1)

20.MAGAZINE FLOOR PLATE GEOMETRY (ADDED FRONT FINGER HOOK)

21. ORANGE FOLLOWER IN MAGAZINES

22.GEN-5 MAGAZINES NOW LACK THE AMBI-MAG-RELEASE CUTOUT RECTANGLE

23.EXTENDED MAG RELEASE (VS GEN 4)

24.EXTRACTOR GEOMETRY IS DIFFERENT

25.THREE DIFFERENT FACTORY SIGHT OPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE ::
– PLASTIC OEM SIGHT (STANDARD)

– 3-DOT TRITIUM NIGHT SIGHTS
– AMERIGLO SIGHTS WITH A TRITIUM AND PHOTO-LUMINESCENT FRONT SIGHT

26.SLIDE COVER PLATE HAS A WIDER CLEARANCE NOTCH ON THE RIGHT

27.SMOOTH TRIGGER FACE

28.SLIDE-STOP LEVER IS MADE FROM A THICKER GAUGE OF STEEL

29.SLIDE-STOP LEFER TABS ANGLE OUT ABOUT 5º

30.THE SLOT IN THE PICATINNY RAIL IS WIDER

31. TRIGGER GUARD IS UNDER-CUT FOR MIDDLE FINGER (BUT NOT A LOT)

32.MAKER MARKS AND IMPORT MARKS MOVED TO LOWER PORTION OF THE GRIP

33.SLIDE IS ABOUT 2mm LONGER THAN THE FRAME (GENs 1-4 WERE FLUSH)

34.LETTERING ON THE SLIDE IS LASER CUT (VS ROLLED OR STAMPED)

35.LOCKING BLOCK PIN GROOVES ARE SHALLOWER AND WIDER (VS G1-4)

36.TRIGGER W/TRIGGER BAR GEOMETRY ALTERED TO ALLOW FOR THE AMBI SLIDE STOP LEVER; AND TO ACCOUNT FOR THE COMPRESSION TYPE TRIGGER SPRING

37.EJECTOR TAB IS WIDER, STRONGER, AND IS CANTED TO SLIGHTLY FOR BETTER CONTACT WITH THE CASE

38.REAR SIGHT NOTCH IS WIDER ON THE STOCK POLYMER SIGHTS

 

 

QUESTIONS ::

1.     CAN A GEN 5 FIRING PIN SAFETY PLUNGER BE RETRO-FITTED INTO GEN 4 OR GEN 3,2,1… GUNS FOR PREVENTION OF TRIGGER BAR FLEXION PROBLEMS?   AND/OR SMOOTHER TRIGGER PULL?

NO.

2.    CAN A GEN 4 SLIDE STOP BE FITTED INTO A GEN 5?

LIKELY NOT.   (THE RAILS ARE THICKER IN GEN 5).

3.    DOES A GEN 4 CONNECTOR WORK IN A GEN 5?

YES.

4.     

FOR A GOOD VIDEO DETAIL OF MOST OF THE DIFFERENCES, TRY THIS ONE BY SOOCH00 

 

USCCA Instructor Certification Process

First the money stuff ::   The total is just under $600.    (The online ‘E-learning’ portion is $147and the toolkit is $103, if purchased together, for a subtotal of $250 (from the USCCA).   The actual classroom, 2-day course (my part) is $347, totaling $597.00).   I don’t think the toolkit is technically REQUIRED for certification, but is a good idea.  If you will be teaching a class, then it IS required, as it contains books and the PowerPoint content, among other things.

So, your very first class, with only 4 students, each at $150 ---  pays for your certification.   Past that ::  ALL PROFIT.

 

Now, the details . . .

Steps To Become A Certified Instructor ::

1. Activate and complete the USCCA Concealed Carry & Home Defense Fundamentals eLearning module.

At this time, you will also purchase your USCCA Instructor Toolkit which includes your classroom presentation PowerPoint, 10 copies of Concealed Carry & Home Defense Fundamentals by Michael Martin, a classroom poster, 10 copies of Concealed Carry Magazine, and a USCCA Instructor Polo and range cap.

Call 1-877-577-4800 to purchase your eLearning module and to order your toolkit. Instructor candidates can purchase these together at a discounted price. (You will receive your toolkit after completing Step 3, the USCCA Instructor Certification Course.)

2. Find and Sign up for a USCCA Instructor Certification class with a USCCA Training Counselor near you.

3. Attend a USCCA Instructor Certification course with a USCCA Training Counselor and qualify by passing both live fire and written examinations. You will receive your toolkit after completing the USCCA Instructor Certification Course.

 

For Step 1;  I spent probably 20 to 30 hours doing the online portion, but I am dyslexic, so I read at a snail’s pace.  Also, I wanted to absorb every last detail, and that added some extra time, too.

For Step 2;  That’s me (Eric Welsh).

For Step 3;  This is the live, in-person class time that you signed up for. (But the online part needs to be complete 3 weeks in advance.)

 

Materials needed for the 2-day class at ACC ::

·        Notebook

·        Pens / Pencils

·        Pop, if you have a favorite

·        Lunch, and snacks

·        Your carry gear, incl. gun, holster, magazines, and mag carriers

·        50 rounds ammo

·        A happy, positive attitude

·        ACC’s address is ::  29595 Leonard Road, Atlanta  IN46031

A syllabus will include ::

A.   Instructor Development ::  Instructor Mistakes and How to Avoid Them.

B.   Instructor Development ::  Teaching Best Practices.

C.   Practical Exercise ::  Teaching using the Personal Method.

D.  Instructor Development ::  Managing a Safe Live Fire Range.

E.   Practical Exercise ::  Virtual Range Practical Exercise.

 

And utilize highlights from the class outline ::

1.    Developing A Personal & Home Protection Plan

2.   Self-Defense Firearms Basics

3.   Defensive Shooting Fundamentals

4.   The Legal Use of Force

5.   Violent Encounters And Their Aftermath

6.   Gear And Gadgets

7.   Basic And Advanced Skills

8.   Inside School Shootings: What We’ve Learned

9.   Emergency First Aid: Become Your Own First Responder

With 1 – 5 from the above, we will be working on HOW TO TEACH that lesson plan.

The Chain of Events

The other day I was thinking about the primer being the most important part of the firing sequence -- but quickly realized it is only one link in the entire chain . . .

Before the primer can explode, it must be struck...

Before it is struck, the hammer must fall...

Before that, the trigger must be pulled...

And before the trigger is pulled, there must be a decision made to fire the gun...  (There better have been a decision made to fire the gun.   If not, that indicates negligence in trigger finger discipline!)

In the end, I wound up with 17 steps in the chain of events that describes the gun-firing sequence ::

  1. A decision is made to fire the gun, which

  2. Moves your finger into the trigger guard, which

  3. Allows your finger to press the trigger, which

  4. Unleashes the energy stored in the hammer or striker spring, which

  5. Propels the hammer down or striker forward, which

  6. Hits the primer, which

  7. Causes it to explode, which

  8. Ignites the powder, which

  9. Burns -- changing it from a solid to a gas.  Lots of gas, which

  10. Generates the pressure that forces the bullet down the barrel, which

  11. Results in the forward momentum of the bullet going toward the target, and which

  12. Pushes the brass rearward, contacting the breech face, which

  13. Results in the rearward momentum and movement of the slide, which

  14. Ejects the spent case and compresses the recoil spring, which

  15. Uncompresses -- moving the slide back to its forward position, which

  16. Loads a new cartridge into the chamber, which

  17. Reloads the gun for the next shot -- for whenever you decide to shoot it.

Or . . . you pull the trigger -- the gun goes BANG.   Either way you want to look at it...

Be "E-MFAT-IC" about firearm safety !!!

If you can remember my weird spelling of emphatic as "E-MFAT-IC" and what each letter of the mnemonic stands for, you will be well on your way to a safe coexistence with firearms.   Exactly NO ONE ever gave himself or herself an extra hole by FOLLOWING all the safety rules.   First, a brief outline of what the letters represent.  Later, I explain in detail the full meaning behind each letter..

 

E - Empty the gun of all ammo.  Every time you pick one up.

M - Muzzle.   Always aim the gun in the safest possible direction, even when it is empty.

F - Finger.   Keep your finger off the trigger until on target and ready to engage.

A - Ammo.   Keep your gun loaded when you are using it, and keep it unloaded when you are not.

T - Target.  ID your Target and know what is around it.

I - Information.   Gather all you can.  Ingest it.

C - Concentrate.   Give firearms 100% of your attention.

 

If there was a good way to work in an "R", it would stand for "Redundant".   These rules overlap each other -- on purpose -- by design.  So if you manage to mess one of them up, the others still are protecting you.  But this is true ONLY if you are following ALL of the rules -- ALL of the time.

Now, on to the detail.

E - Empty the gun of all ammo.  Every time you pick one up.  

          This applies when you are handling the gun for any reason other than putting holes in the target.   Examples might be cleaning, storage, adding new parts, show and tell; that sort of thing.   Utilizing the redundancy principle, I check for 'clear' three different ways before I start the process of cleaning.  First, I do a visual check -- by looking into the chamber(s) with either the slide locked to the rear, or with the cylinder open for revolvers.   Second, I check tactilely -- by feeling for a magazine and sticking a pinkie or cleaning rod into the chamber from the back (properly called the breech) end, NOT from the muzzle end !!!    Third -- I check visually again, from a different angle or from a different direction.    Mainly this 'check 3 times' process keeps my head in the game.  The point is to maintain the habit of ALWAYS checking for Empty.   If you get distracted while cleaning or working, check the gun again.

          If anyone hands you a gun, check for yourself that the gun is Empty of ammo.  Don't let the phrase "It's OK, it's not loaded" lull you into not checking.   Make sure to get the muzzle pointed into the safest possible direction first.  

 

M - Muzzle.   Always aim the gun in the safest possible direction, even when it is empty.

          Muzzle direction is the first of the classic "4 rules of firearms safety" as listed by Col. Jeff Cooper and many, many others.   MFAT is the acronym I use to remember them easily.  Of the four, Muzzle and Finger 'discipline' are tied for the most important.  These are the main two that complement each other -- always do both, because each is protecting you if you mess up the other.

          By "safest possible direction" I am trying to impress that there are two parts to this.  One is to be aware of the Muzzle itself; the second is to be aware of everything around you, so that you can choose the best aiming point.   Some things to watch for include:  Not sweeping the Muzzle over your hand or fingers while re-holstering or re-bagging.   Keeping the Muzzle clear of your knees while getting ready to clean your gun.  Setting your workbench up so that Muzzles will point to an exterior wall, thus not toward the kitchen, for example.  Consider a backstop for your bench.   At the range, pointing the Muzzle of a handgun straight up or straight down are both bad, but at a gun show either of these may be the least bad of all available direction choices.   Just be aware of where you are, and what the safest possible choice is.

 

F - Finger.   Keep your finger off the trigger until on target and ready to engage.

          Trigger finger placement is the other half of the 'Muzzle/Finger' critical pair.  Your finger should not only be off the trigger, but be completely out of the trigger guard, held straight and as high and away from the trigger as anatomically possible.   This is always the case, until you are actually firing a shot.   If you like the looks of the 'Hollywood' position with your finger on the trigger because you want to "be ready", I would ask, "Ready for what? To put a hole in the next thing that startles you?"  That may be your dog, your kid, or your spouse.  Or your foot, if you got lazy with Muzzle discipline.

 

A - Ammo.   Keep your gun loaded when you are using it, and keep it unloaded when you are not.

          This one often gets shortened into "All guns are always loaded".   Well, yes you should TREAT them as if they are loaded... but it is very important to know, without any doubt, the honest condition of any firearm you are handling.   I.e. is it loaded or not?   If the gun is a self-defense gun, you may be using it 24-7-365; therefore it will be loaded ALL the time.   All other guns stay in a safe, unloaded.  Even at the range, it is a good idea to have a simple gun-bag, with only guns in it -- and then an 'everything else' bag with ammo, tools, glasses, earplugs, etc.   Use a metallic Sharpie to mark Muzzle direction on the outside of your gun bag.  "M-->" e.g.

 

T - Target.  ID your Target and know what is around it.

          Look to the left and right, behind, and sometimes even in front of your Target.   Watch out for having 'tunnel vision'.    At night, when problems statistically are more likely, a flashlight or three is/are necessary.   If you have a light mounted on the accessory rail of your self-defense gun (I think you should) remember that whatever you shine that light at also has a Muzzle pointed at it.  Thus, your need for a second flashlight for 'searching'.   A handheld light of around 100 lumens is perfect for this.  Use the gun-mounted light for final ID of the target.  I keep a third light clipped to the collar of my shirt at all times.  USB rechargeable and with a 15 lumen output, it is perfect for daily/nightly tasks.

          Be absolutely sure you know what you are shooting at.

 

I - Information.   Gather all you can.  Ingest it.

          Read books.  Watch DVD's.  Go to classes.  Go to matches.  Ask questions.  You might even watch YouTube or read online bulletin boards, but filter these with your own common sense.   If you are not sure how to do something, find out how before you think "How hard can it be?" and give it a try.

 

C - Concentrate.   Give firearms 100% of your attention.

          At the range, and during matches, ignore the peanut gallery while you are on the firing line or loading and making ready.  It's natural to want to face people you are talking to, but when you do, where is the Muzzle pointed?  Beware of distractions...

 

Finally, never underestimate the importance of being as safe as possible (ASAP) around firearms.   It is difficult to be too safe, but easy to be unsafe.

Contact me at 765.425.1164 for usage.   Eric Welsh 14NOV2014.